Former contestant Taylor Nolan is under by Washington state health officials for past controversial and extremely questionable comments she made on Twitter.

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Although Washington Department of Health spokesperson Gordon MacCracken confirmed they’re looking into ’s posts on Wednesday, March 24, he clarified that it “doesn’t necessarily mean that disciplinary action will occur, just that we are moving to the stage of an investigation.” He explained there’s no specific timeline for how long the investigation could take, adding that he can’t “predict an outcome.”

Nolan — who is a licensed mental health counselor — first came under fire in February for old , taking aim at the BIPOC, LGBTQ, Asian, Indian, Jewish and mental health communities. The Washington Department of Health contemplated looking into Nolan’s controversial tweets earlier this month after receiving “multiple complaints” from people who felt Nolan’s mental health counselor license should be revoked in light of her posts. 

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The 27-year-old received her license in 2016 and went on to appear on Nick Viall’s season of The Bachelor in 2017 followed by Bachelor in Paradise — which she won.

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Nolan’s tweets, which spanned from 2011-2013, included her calling out “loud ass black people” and saying that “#Asian problem arent sh*t” because stereotypes include “they have a small penis.” She also wrote: “#WeWontWorkIf I have ever diagnosed you with a personality disorder,” and replied to the thread, “treatment: SUICIDE.”

After her tweets went viral in February, the reality star took to Instagram to issue a 30-minute apology, which has since been deleted. “My tweets from 10 years ago are sh*tty, they suck, they were wrong and are hurtful,” she captioned her post, adding that her past commentary doesn’t “take away from the work I do today, they are literally how I got here to doing this work.

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“I never deleted those tweets for a reason because they’ve been a part of my journey since way before going [on] The Bachelor,” she continued, adding that she “didn’t need anyone to call those things out to me to know they were wrong, I’ve been doing that work on my own for the last ten years and it’s the same work I do today and the same work I will continue doing for the rest of my life.”

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After some social media users claimed Nolan — who has been an outspoken advocate against Chris Harrison amid his own recent scandal — was “deflecting” in her statements, she shared another statement, explaining that her post was “a reaction and not an apology.”

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She said she knows “every word of my old tweets are harmful, wrong, triggering and incredibly upsetting to the communities that I identify with and that I support,” before apologizing “to the folks that were triggered and re-traumatized by seeing the hurtful words from my past.” Nolan then apologized to every group she offended from the “women and survivors of sexual assault” to those “struggling with body shame and fatphobia.”