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“Yet only 20% of chefs are . We’re on a mission to change the gender ratio in the restaurant industry by empowering female employees with the opportunity to pursue a culinary career,” the chain wrote. 

The first was no accident, Burger also took out a full-page ad in The New York Times, with the same message. “Women in the ” was in giant font with the further context in small print below. 

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People were outraged with the fast food giant’s tweet, claiming the messaging was perpetuating sexism. “This is how not to promote something. Most people wont read the thread and took this as Burger King being sexist,” one user wrote, adding: “And they are literally using women as a marketing tool by purposely offending people. This is super sleazy and gross.” 

Another user wondered why the company didn’t go with the more obvious route: change its name to “Burger Queen” for the day. While a third wrote, “Now who told Burger King using a sexist tweet as click bait on IWD was a good idea?” 

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In a statement Monday afternoon, the burger chain admitted the tweet was “designed to draw attention.” 

“It was our mistake to not include the full explanation in our initial tweet and have adjusted our activity moving forward because we’re sure that when people read the entirety of our commitment, they will share our belief in this important opportunity,” a spokesperson said, emphasizing it is “committed to helping women break through a male-dominated culinary culture.” 

Scroll through to see more from Burger King U.K.’s tweet. 

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