Cremation is becoming a popular alternative to burials, not just for the price point, but also because of the environmental impact of modern burials. However, even though cremation is better for the environment overall, the process is not without its drawbacks. For one, cremation releases large amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, which is one of the gases responsible for climate change.

Because of this, a new body disposal method has sprung up in Ontario, Canada. They call it “environmentally friendly cremation.”

Dale Hilton, a proponent of so-called green funerals, shows the pressurized vessel his Smiths Falls, Ont., business uses to break down human remains. The liquid waste is then disposed into the town's sewer system, while powdered remains are returned to the loved one's family.

Where cremation uses fire to break down the body’s organic material, green cremation uses an alkaline solution to literally dissolve the body until all that’s left is the skeleton.

Where cremation uses fire to break down the body's organic material, green cremation uses an alkaline solution to literally dissolve the body until all that's left is the skeleton.

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The process mimics the natural decomposition of a corpse, but it’s done much quicker. The resulting coffee-colored “sludge” is filtered to remove any chemicals, and the rest is drained into the sewage system!

The process mimics the natural decomposition of a corpse, but it's done much faster. The resulting coffee-colored "sludge" is filtered to remove any chemicals, and the rest is drained into the sewage system.

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‘Nothing to be concerned about’

Before Aquagreen Dispositions opened, Ted Joynt, the superintendent of facilities for Smiths Falls and the municipal employee responsible for water treatment, inspected the business.

“We keep an eye on these things,” said Joynt, whose staff samples the water discharged by the users of the Galipeau Centre campus weekly at the point where it enters the town’s sewer system.

Joynt said staff measured two spikes in the output readings from the Galipeau Centre over the last year, but those measurements were within the range acceptable for other commercial water users, and — in any case — the abnormalities couldn’t be definitively traced back to Aquagreen Dispositions.

The bones are then dried, crushed into powder, and returned back to the family.

The bones are then dried, crushed into powder, and given back to the family.

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It’s not traditional, but with funeral costs rising every year, for sure we’ll start seeing more and more of these green cremations.

It's not traditional, but with funeral costs rising every year, I bet we'll start seeing more and more of these green cremations.

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(via Yahoo)

 

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